"Go to the sign of Harvel's Axe, a dubious inn on the edge of the Thieves Quarter, in the City of Greyhawk, and look to your own wrist. If you perceive a bracelet and dangling dice, watch for the next throw in the war between Law and Chaos and be prepared to follow the compelling geas." -Signal

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

AEG Dungeons, White Rabbit

Dungeons is again one of the earlier supplements for the 3e of  D&D. Though written for the 3e it is generic enough in nature  that it can be used by a DM for almost any game system. The items  that are specific can easily be adapted. I find that the earlier  books written for the new system are much more generic in nature  and tend to shy away more than later one on hardcore rules.

This book comes in at 120 pages and is broken down into four  major section. The first two section are informative in nature  and pain dungeons in broad strokes avoiding a lot of system  specific type on information. The second two section are geared  first towards the player and then the the Dungeon Master. These  are where you will find your system specific information more than  in the earlier chapters.

The first section is Tips and Tricks. It contains a mixture of  information that is geared towards the player as well as the DM  though most of it will be DM level advice. The section covers a  variety of topics with some of the highlights being mapping,  equipment and traps. One of the other topics covered though is  dungeon ecology and this is something that I find is often  overlooked when designing a dungeon.

The second section goes over the various types of dungeons that  the players might encounter. The book puts forth that there are  eight types of dungeon. Each of these is covered in great detail.  The dungeon types are Fortress, Madman's Lair, Mine, Caverns,  Sewers, Subterranean Communities, Temple and Tombs. I want to  stress how much I liked this section. Each of the types has  specific questions raised about what might be specific to that  dungeon type and things to consider when designing it.

The third section is the 3e specific portion of the book for the  players. This section contains everything that one has come to  expect for a 3e supplement. It has lists of new feats and skills  for the players to use. It also has new spells but also some  mundane items that would be dungeon specific for the players to  utilize. Finally it has four new prestige classes for players to  use. I won't go into too much detail on these as I have a known  bias against prestige classes.

The fourth section is geared towards the DM. This is something  that is still 3e specific but I find that these are items that  are more easily ported to other systems and are therefore more  forgiving to them for some reason. It again has all the standard  fare for 3e books. It has seven new monsters with a new template  to be applied to monsters. It also includes seven additional  magic items for the DM to use in the dungeons they design.  Finally it includes some items that are closer to being system  neutral. It has new traps as well as three sample dungeons.  Though written edition specific one can always steal maps and  content for conversion.

Overall I have to say the book is worth picking up. It has enough  general information that makes it good for use with any game  system that would feature dungeons. The system specific  information is there but many parts can easily be adapted with  little effort and what is there is well done. The layout of the  book and the art used are well done and in no way a detriment to  the book.

Published: 2001
Pages: 120

From the back of the book:

The Definitive Guide to Dungeons and Catacombs for Players and  DMs Alike

Dungeons are an integral part of fantasy gaming, but there's far  more to them than just stone corridors and random monsters. This  book contains a plethora of tips, tricks and rules to help make  your dungeons the stuff of legend. It includes essays on design  and construction, overviews of different dungeon types, player  advice for surviving underground perils, and a host of new rules,  spells, monsters, and magic items.




Spell:

White Rabbit


Level: Second
Range: 3"
Duration: 2 Rounds + 1 Round/Level
Area of Effect: 1 Creature/Level
Components: V,S
Casting Time: 2 Segments
Saving Throw: Negates

When this spell is cast the magic user causes an illusion of some  weird creature or individual to appear behind the party. Other  than those in the caster's party will find their attention drawn  to this manifestation unless a saving throw is made.

The illusion once created will perform actions to draw as much  attention to itself from all around. This is most often  accomplished by running into the center of the room and making a  scene of some sort. It will then run away in the manner best used to  draw away those in pursuit from the caster.

While the spell is in effect any attempt to hit or cast spells on  the illusion will seem to work but not cause the illusion enough  damage to stop its flight. Those who fail their save will pursue  the illusion until such time as it vanishes. Any attack on the  victims will cause them to forget the illusion though and return  their attention to the party.

By default the illusion will be a largish white rabbit dressed in  fine clothes and with the ability to talk. It will complain how  late it is be in an apparent state of confusion about where it  is. The player can of course make it anything they want but  unless specified it will be a talking white rabbit.

Disclaimer: The spells that you will see, for how ever long the  write ups last, were all written up or conceived of back in the  80's so the terminology may not appropriate for anything other  than 1e and depending on how well I did back then it may be  slightly off for that as well. If there is any duplication of  spells that exist now it is most likely I wrote mine first :)  Please feel free to comment on them but try not to be too hard on  me. If anyone wishes to use these in anything they print please  let me know in advance and all I ask is proper credit.

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